Stained Glass Windows

The inspiring stained-glass work in the Cathedral can be classified in four distinct groups: Royal Bavarian glass circa 1890; Franz Meyer of Munich portrait stained glass circa 1908; Franz Meyer stencil stained-stained glass circa 1908; and Hunt’s stained-glass above the organ loft circa 1950.

Interestingly, the stencil windows in the Cathedral originally were only temporary settings that later were to be replaced by figurative images. But World War I intervened and created more pressing needs for what money there was. The change, once postponed, was never completed, and the stencil windows have become permanent fixtures in the Cathedral.

When the 1992 renovation began, a complete study of the stained-glass windows was conducted. Findings showed that the leading in the windows had severely deteriorated and that the glass, now valued at $3.2 million, wasn’t secured in frames but merely hung on crossbars.

As a result, a complete restoration program was undertaken, and over 3,000 square feet of glass was cleaned, restored and framed.

Color from the stained-glass now floods the Cathedral and reflects off the marble and wood surfaces throughout. The stencil windows are positioned to create a feeling of balance and harmony in the Cathedral space. The portrait and stencil windows are outlined in clear glass to allow natural light to enter the Cathedral, giving an uplifting feeling for liturgies and prayer.